BIZOL Blog https://www.bizol.com/blog BIZOL Blog - innovative motor oils and car care products Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:44:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.5 Additives — The Pros and Cons https://www.bizol.com/blog/additives-the-pros-and-cons/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/additives-the-pros-and-cons/#respond Mon, 17 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2228 The arguments surrounding the subject of additives and their real-world efficacy has been raging for as long as additives have been on the market. Will a friction modifier lower engine wear or a fuel-system cleaner really make a noticeable difference to performance? The arguments pro and contra run almost entirely always along ideological dividing lines, […]

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The arguments surrounding the subject of additives and their real-world efficacy has been raging for as long as additives have been on the market. Will a friction modifier lower engine wear or a fuel-system cleaner really make a noticeable difference to performance? The arguments pro and contra run almost entirely always along ideological dividing lines, based on deep-seated beliefs held on both sides of the debate.

It is easy to see why there is some scepticism, as gains are often not as pronounced as expected and not easy to demonstrate via simple tests, quite often relying on anecdotal evidence from personal testimony. Equally, those who use products year after year are also convinced that the benefits they report are more than just perceived gains. Add to that the solid science behind the products and it’s a recipe for conflict.

Conversely and unexpectedly, the answer is much more straightforward than you might think. Additives most definitely do work, which is easy enough to prove. All vehicle manufacturers specify them in their approved oils and lubricant manufacturers use different additive packages to blend their oils. The use of additives is conventional wisdom and modern engines and engine oils cannot do without them. You find additives in fuels to prevent waxing, stop engine knock etc, the list of applications is long.

The controversy arises around the debate as to whether individual products actually deliver what the manufacturers claim. The trouble being is that it is very hard to prove positive effects, like with benefits to health claimed by food producers.

No doubt eating a low-fat margarine will benefit your cardiovascular system over time by reducing your saturated fat intake, but a much more noticeable effect is gained from getting regular exercise. What is true for your diet is also true for additives, i.e., there are numerous factors that can affect the outcome of a treatment, which is why it is so difficult to obtain hard evidence of gains.

OILS

Additive packages in engine oils differ vastly according to the engine’s needs and motor manufacturer’s specifications. For example, antioxidants slow down the oil-aging process, this is why long-life oils contain higher amounts of antioxidants. But what if a long-life oil is either too expensive or simply not specified for the vehicle? This is precisely the situation where additives come into play and why the discussion around additives gets clouded by a lack of understanding as to what they can and what they cannot be used for.

Testing the efficacy of additives is often based on finding specific improvements which the additive cannot deliver. Most additives simply prevent wear or restore lost performance if the manufacturer has done a good job.

The advantages offered by modern engine oils with wear-reducing additives, such as tungsten particles, is often not available to older generation engines, because the respective oils are not based on that technology.

Here again, rather than buying an unsuitable modern engine oil, it often makes sense to use an additive containing a wear-reducing component. A one-shot additive is often the cheaper option in the long-run because one treatment lasts for several oil changes, not just until the oil is drained.

FUEL SYSTEM CLEANERS

Often it is claimed that additives are not necessary for vehicles driven in regions such as Europe or the USA etc, with a reliable supply of high-quality fuel and lubricants. However, even if a vehicle is maintained to a high standard and only high-quality fuels and lubricants are used, deposits still build up.

No air filter or oil filter can remove all of the contaminants contained in the medium it is filtering, which is one reason why residues form. Deposits accumulate over time, for example, as fuel decomposes, during the combustion process and many other reasons. Fuel system additives are designed to maintain a clean fuel system from the fuel tank to the combustion chamber.

One-shot cleaners are actually an effective and non-invasive method of removing deposits without the need to disassemble components or entire systems. Inlet valve stems are a recognised weakness, because they are susceptible to carbon build up, causing them to stick and not seal correctly, resulting in poor starting behaviour. The problem of sticking valves is especially pronounced under cold cranking conditions.

Fuel system cleaners can rectify this situation by breaking down heavy deposits, freeing the valve stems from carbon and allowing the valves to operate freely again.

From the maintenance perspective, it is only logical that additives are used at regular intervals to remove stubborn contamination from the fuel delivery systems and air-intake components. If the fuel system is not cleaned periodically, it can lead to increased fuel consumption, reduced power output and increased emissions.

Obviously, in the case of regions where high-quality additives are not contained in fuel to the same degree – or where tricks are used to increase the octane or cetane number of the fuel – is where aftermarket additives can make a significant difference.

FRICTION MODIFIERS

The principle behind adding friction modifiers to engine oils is to minimise power loss caused by friction losses in internal combustion engines. The loss of power can be traced back to contributory factors, such as viscous drag in the lubricant film separating the moving parts of the engine. Friction modifiers help to reduce the viscous drag whilst at the same time maintaining the crucial boundary lubricant film.

The role of the friction modifier here is to provide additives that are not contained in the engine oil. After adding the friction modifier, a molecule film is adsorbed by the metal surfaces in the engine, coating cylinders walls and piston rings. The layer covering the metal surfaces inside the engine, improves lubricant shear characteristics during relative motion. Lower friction results from the reduced film drag and can result in improved power and/or better fuel economy.

Premium quality oils often contain some friction modifying and anti-wear components as used in aftermarket additives. Standard oils, however, often do not contain the high-quality additives contained in the premium products, and this is the sort of scenario where a one-shot friction modifier comes into its own.

In effect, the whole dispute over efficacy and the quandary around the use of additives revolves around some additive producers making over-zealous claims about their products, often creating expectations that cannot be met. So, before you decide to purchase an additive, consider your options, i.e., the benefits you are looking for and whether you expect a massive performance boost or just to regain some of the performance lost over time.

One thing that you can be sure of is that an additive cannot reverse years of wear and tear. What additives often do well is to restore lost power, quieten a minor rumble, cure a minor leak or remove deposits.

What should you expect when you buy an additive? Realistic expectations are the order of the day. Do expect modest gains. Do not expect a new car with more power than it had when it left the factory.

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BIZOL Allround 0W-20 — Why do you need it and what makes it so special? https://www.bizol.com/blog/bizol-allround-0w-20-why-do-you-need-it-and-what-makes-it-so-special/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/bizol-allround-0w-20-why-do-you-need-it-and-what-makes-it-so-special/#respond Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:44:49 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2236 Engine oils in the low-viscosity range are ideally suited for use in downsized, normally-aspirated and forced-induction engines that have the latest emission-control systems, direct injection and automatic stop-start systems. BIZOL Allround 0W-20 was primarily formulated to improve fuel economy and reduce CO2 emissions in modern engines whilst providing premium levels of lubrication and protection. BIZOL Allround 0W-20 […]

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Engine oils in the low-viscosity range are ideally suited for use in downsized, normally-aspirated and forced-induction engines that have the latest emission-control systems, direct injection and automatic stop-start systems. BIZOL Allround 0W-20 was primarily formulated to improve fuel economy and reduce CO2 emissions in modern engines whilst providing premium levels of lubrication and protection.

BIZOL Allround 0W-20 fulfils the requirements of the API SP/SN Plus and ILSAC GF‑6A specifications. The sophisticated package of additives used has been developed to protect against low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) and timing chain wear, provide improved high-temperature deposit protection for pistons and the turbocharger and much more stringent control of sludge and varnish deposits.

The fact that Allround 0W-20 meets the ILSAC GF‑6A standard is highly relevant, as a large number of hybrid models on the road today were pioneered and perfected by Asian manufacturers.

Low-viscosity oils are inherently thin, which has both upsides and downsides. Using a low viscosity oil generally improves fuel economy and emissions overall but it can also cause increased oil consumption. Consumers, however, can rest assured because BIZOL Allround 0W-20 is a lubricant which excels at maintaining exceedingly low levels of oil consumption.

BIZOL Allround 0W-20 has a multitude of benefits, such as excellent dispersing and antioxidant properties i.e., it ensures long-lasting cleanliness of all internal engine components, can prolong engine life and facilitate long maintenance intervals.

Ever since the emergence of the hybrid powertrain, there has been a continual increase in hybrid-vehicle sales volumes. The proliferation of low-emission vehicles (LEV) has steadily contributed to a significant reduction in air pollution. LEVs have made the greatest difference in city traffic where the rate of start-stop cycles is highest and average fuel economy is lowest.

Most Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) offer excellent flexibility and can be charged using a domestic power supply from the normal mains power grid. The simplicity of operation has resulted in widespread acceptance. Added to this, is the fact that governments have encouraged the uptake of hybrid vehicles by offering subsidies and tax breaks to potential buyers. Under such conditions, it is plain to see why the vehicles using this alternative drive system have become a popular ‘green’ option.

The emergence of the hybrid powertrain, however, has brought its own set of problems. Lubricant manufacturers, for example, have had to find ways to tackle new challenges associated with hybrid configurations. Ever more stringent emissions standards and changes to engine operating modes have necessitated a radical rethink of oil formulations to counteract higher wear and harsher operating conditions that these changes have caused.

All of these factors were taken into account when formulating BIZOL Allround 0W-20, meaning it was equipped from day one to meet the special requirements and exacting demands of hybrid-vehicle engines and downsized conventional engines. In many hybrids, the engine is repeatedly switched on/off for brief periods. Continually switching the engine on and off is the equivalent of a cold start over and over again in a vehicle with a conventional powertrain.

Repeated cold-starts take a heavy toll on any engine, with the arduous conditions adversely affecting the wear rates of engines in both conventional and hybrid powertrains. The need to counteract these adverse effects has, however, also brought significant benefits to conventional internal combustion engines, as the quality of lubrication has distinctly improved.

BIZOL Allround 0W-20 has been formulated to fit this tough requirement profile like a glove with its special package of additives. It has low-friction properties and rapidly provides a reliable lubrication film, even under difficult operating conditions. Its outstanding viscosity profile means the oil can provide immediate wear protection which, in turn, promotes smooth running and a long engine life.

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Routine maintenance – the key to saving money and getting to know your car better https://www.bizol.com/blog/routine-car-maintenance-saving-money/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/routine-car-maintenance-saving-money/#respond Wed, 22 Dec 2021 09:06:35 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2124 If you are mechanically inclined and possess basic car maintenance skills, you can save yourself a handful of cash and get to know your vehicle better at the same time. Getting to know all of the vehicle’s little idiosyncrasies and how to dismantle and reassemble parts of the car is a massive advantage if something […]

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If you are mechanically inclined and possess basic car maintenance skills, you can save yourself a handful of cash and get to know your vehicle better at the same time. Getting to know all of the vehicle’s little idiosyncrasies and how to dismantle and reassemble parts of the car is a massive advantage if something unforeseen does go wrong at the roadside.

But before you can get going, you will have to build up a basic set of tools. All you really need is a basic kit, just enough to get you by. The trouble with tools is that it can be tempting to buy the odd tool or piece of equipment here and there, but a lot of the time you can get by without an extensive range of implements.

Try to avoid buying special tools, such as a wheel bearing replacement tool, unless you will need them again. The likelihood is that you won’t need the tool again and you can often find a way to do the job that avoids the use of a special tool.

Carrying out maintenance is basically an investment in the future and you should never forget that you are buying tools to avoid having to pay someone else to do the work for you. If the price of the tool exceeds the cost of a repair, then you have to ask yourself if the investment is worth it.

Where it really makes sense to invest, is in tools that are needed for recurring tasks, such as filter changes or spark plug replacement etc. The cost of standard tools is nearly always worth it, a good set of screwdrivers, for example, can be also used around the home.

But what is essential and what is nice to have? The following list should help you to make informed choices when building up your toolkit.

  • Vehicle jack

From changing a wheel to replacing a drive belt, most of the maintenance work you will ever do will require a jack. It is difficult to spend too much on a good quality jack. The best type for quick and safe lifting is a trolley jack. Trolley jacks are usually very robust, have wide wheels and lift the vehicle quickly. Whatever jack type you purchase, make sure it has sufficient load capacity.

  • Axle stands

Essential, just like a good quality jack. Good quality axle stands must be used to secure the vehicle as soon as the wheels leave the ground. Never leave a vehicle supported by the jack alone! The vehicle can slip off the jack or the car might sudden lower due to the valve not being closed properly or the hydraulics failing. Nobody wants one and a half tons of motor vehicle resting on their chest, so, if the vehicle has to be lifted, always place the vehicle on axle stands! Only buy stands that have been tested and are approved.

  • Magnetic inspection lamp

The magnetic inspection lamp is an essential item, because much of the work in the engine bay or under the vehicle is in places where daylight does not reach. You will be surprised just how much easier some repairs become when the parts you are working on are properly illuminated.

  • Spanners

You cannot maintain a vehicle without a decent set of spanners, comprising at least the standard 8 – 19 mm sizes. Vehicle manufacturers are increasingly using quick-release couplings or clips where previously a nut and bolt were used, nevertheless, without a set of spanners you have no chance. The most useful type is the combination spanner, with an open-end at one end and ring-end at the other. The more you spend on quality spanners, the better. Cheap spanners will not undo very tight fasteners and can even be dangerous to use, due to the spanner jaws spreading or snapping under load!

  • Screwdrivers

You cannot perform car maintenance unless you have a good selection of screwdrivers. A comprehensive set includes slotted, Posidriv, Torx and Phillips. Always buy screwdrivers with hardened tips. If your screwdrivers do not have hardened tips, as soon as you encounter a screw that is properly tight, you will end up with a twisted screwdriver tip and could get stuck in the middle of a repair, unable to finish it.

  • Socket set

If you intend to take on any serious maintenance or repair work, you cannot do it without a comprehensive socket set. Preferably, you should purchase standard reach and deep-reach sockets comprising at least the standard 8 – 19 mm sizes and a good quality ratchet.

  • Breaker bar

Another essential item in your arsenal. A good quality breaker bar cannot be replaced by any other tool, full stop. Even a good impact wrench can let you down, but more often than not a breaker is the only tool than can loosen an extremely tight fastener; especially where access is limited. Here again, you get what you pay for and only very few are actually up to the job.

  • Pliers

Pliers are another essential for basic maintenance. The most useful pliers for general use are:

  • long-nose (or needle-nose pliers) for difficult to reach areas
  • slip-joint pliers – extremely versatile as they can grip items of different sizes
  • combination pliers – which usually include side cutters for wire and cable cutting
  • side cutters – to quickly and cleanly cut cable ties, steel wire and copper cable
  • Locking pliers

Nice to have: locking pliers are usually known under the trademark ‘Vise Grip’. The ‘grips’ can hold things in place or be used to hold a part when you want to remove something i.e., loosen a part that is seized in place. Locking pliers are not intended as a substitute for a spanner or socket because locking pliers can damage the fastener.

  • Drain bowl

A proper drain bowl, whether it is used for coolant, gear oil or engine oil is a great help because you can catch and dispose of the fluid properly. Drain bowls are normally designed to reduce splashing and also have a separate drain so that used fluid can be simply poured back into its original container and returned for safe recycling.

  • Dead blow hammer

Use of a hammer should be kept to a minimum when performing maintenance or repairing a vehicle as it is easy to do untold damage with just a single hammer blow. A dead blow hammer or rubber mallet can be a useful tool, for example, when a bolt is seized in position.

  • Mini socket set

Mini socket sets have been on the market for a few years now and are excellent for light work; especially working on the vehicle interior. Mini socket sets fit in your pocket and usually include Posidriv, Torx, slotted and Phillips bits for undoing screws and ¼ drive sockets for hex-head fasteners, such as trim screws.

  • Torque Wrench

Another essential, as most vehicle fasteners have a specified tightening torque which is stated by the manufacturer. Tightening brake components, wheels nuts, steering components etc. to the correct torque is a safety critical part of any repair because a ‘guesstimate’ just isn’t good enough.

  • Multimeter

Nice to have: depending on the complexity of the maintenance or repair work you want to tackle. A multimeter is a great piece of kit to check battery voltage, voltage supply, resistance across a component, etc. As soon as the car develops an electrical fault, you will need a multimeter.

  • Magnetic parts tray

An extremely useful item, just remove a clip, nut, clevis pin, etc and put it in the tray. You will no longer need to spend what seems like an eternity searching for tiny lost parts on a grubby floor or in the engine bay. A magnetic tray will help you to keep all of the ferrous parts stored safely in one place.

  • Impact wrench (battery-powered)

Nice to have: unless you regularly perform major jobs.
Do not buy an air impact wrench unless you want to invest in a compressor and have air lines snaking around the floor. Nowadays, the more flexible solution is a high-quality battery impact wrench. A modern, high torque battery impact wrench is great for removing wheels rapidly and making light work of other fasteners.

  • Jump leads

Nice to have: for the event that the battery just refuses to start the vehicle. Always practical because “you never know”, but if you keep an eye on the battery and replace it in good time, it is unlikely that you will ‘need’ a set of jump leads.

Summary

There are several factors to take into account when deciding what to buy and how much to spend. Firstly, do you intend to maintain your vehicle on a regular basis? Secondly, which jobs does it make sense to tackle yourself and which ones do you leave to the professionals? Once you have answered those questions, you have a good basis upon which to make the economic case for spending more or less money.

A further consideration is how well you expect the tools and equipment to perform, as there are vast differences in tool quality. The more complex work you take on, the greater the emphasis you will have to place on quality of the tools you use. You do not want to be in the situation where you have broken a cheap tool during disassembly, the vehicle is immobilised and you are unable to reassemble the vehicle.

The greater the safety relevance, the more money you need to invest. Often it is better to buy well looked after, used tools than cheap modern tools; especially if a mechanic or garage is winding up their business up and selling off professional-quality tools.

The saying “you get what you pay for” isn’t always true, but branded tools are usually the better choice and the difference between a cheap set of spanners and a more expensive set can be worth it after just one job.

When deciding what to buy, look at your needs beforehand and spend your budget wisely. It is often better to buy fewer tools, but good quality than lots of cheap tools, as you can always add tools at a later date.

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How to jump start vehicles properly https://www.bizol.com/blog/how-to-jump-start-vehicles-properly/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/how-to-jump-start-vehicles-properly/#respond Tue, 21 Dec 2021 12:06:46 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2116 Jump-starting – what you need to know Check the owner’s manualConsult the manual to see if there are specific jump-starting instructions for the vehicle. Some vehicles have special terminals, which are specifically designated for jump-starting. The jump leads must only be connected to the designated terminals provided on these vehicles. Note: Take care when jump-starting. […]

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Jump-starting – what you need to know

  • Check the owner’s manual
    Consult the manual to see if there are specific jump-starting instructions for the vehicle. Some vehicles have special terminals, which are specifically designated for jump-starting. The jump leads must only be connected to the designated terminals provided on these vehicles.

Note: Take care when jump-starting. If, for example, sparks are created when connecting the leads, this can damage the vehicle’s electronic components.

  • Check that the jump leads are suitable.
    Jump leads only permit a certain current flow, with the current carrying capacity usually being marked on the packaging. The jump leads may not have sufficient transmission capacity to start a certain vehicle with a heavily discharged battery.

Note: a small city car cannot jump-start a large four-wheel drive vehicle, even with the engine running. The donor vehicle should be of a comparable size.

  • Wear safety goggles
    Lead-acid batteries produce explosive gas, which could be ignited by sparks from connecting terminals. Wearing goggles will protect your eyes from the effects of an explosion!
  • Locate the discharged battery (or jump-starting terminals)
    Locate the donor vehicle’s battery and move the donor vehicle as close as you can to the discharged battery. The vehicles must not touch!
  • Check the routing of jump leads
    Make sure that the leads cannot get caught in the cooling fan if it suddenly starts turning or the drive belts or any other rotating parts cannot get snagged when the engine is started.
  • Make sure the ignition switch is in the ‘off’ position
    Check also that the gearbox is in ‘neutral’ (manual) or in ‘park’ (automatic) and the parking brake is applied.
  • Turn off all consumers
    Power drains on vehicle with the discharged battery such as the lights, radio etc. must be switched off before jump starting.
  • Switch on the blower motor
    Switching on the blower motor minimises any damage caused by an electrical surge.

What jump leads do I need?

A brief word about booster cables, jump leads, jumper cables, starter cables etc.,

Whatever you like to call them, jump leads are not all the same, high quality jump leads are expensive. The reason why a good lead set is expensive, is simply due to the components used and thickness of the cables. The greater the current requirement, the thicker and more expensive the cable and terminal clamps.

Note: if you use jump leads with thin cables – usually low-price leads – that are not up to the task, either the cables will start to melt the insulation – producing harmful smoke – or the vehicle will not start; or both!

Vehicles with large engines or with start-stop technology have high-capacity batteries and must be connected using heavy-duty jump leads. The packaging will state what size engine or current range the leads are suitable for.

As regards the length of the jump leads, the longer the cables are, the thicker they will have to be in order to transfer the same current.

Quick guide on how to jump-start a vehicle

Connect the jump leads in the following order:

  1. Connect the red jump lead to the positive terminal of the discharged battery (or jump-start terminal).
  2. Connect the other end of the red lead to the positive terminal of the donor vehicle battery or jump start terminal.
  3. Connect the black jump lead to the negative terminal of the donor vehicle battery or jump start terminal.
  4. Connect the other end of the black cable to a properly earthed bolt or bracket on the engine block of the vehicle being jump started, not to the battery terminal. Sparks can ignite hydrogen gas emitted by the discharged battery, which can cause an explosion!
  5. Start the engine of the vehicle with the fully charged battery and let it run to charge both batteries; preferably at an engine speed of approximately 1,500 – 2,500 rpm.
  6. Start the engine of the vehicle with the discharged battery.
  7. Let the engine speed return to idle on both vehicles.
  8. Remove the jump leads in the reverse order they were attached.
    Make absolutely sure that the red and black terminals do not touch each other when doing so!

Drive the vehicle with the discharged battery for 20-30 minutes to get the battery back up to full charge. Finally, check the condition of the charging system and vehicle battery to make sure they are in a serviceable condition.

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Moto is the right choice for motorcyclists https://www.bizol.com/blog/moto-is-the-right-choice-for-motorcyclists/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/moto-is-the-right-choice-for-motorcyclists/#respond Thu, 16 Dec 2021 14:57:46 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2185 BIZOL’s range of motorcycle oils is blended from high-quality oils and additives to provide a unique level of protection. We have formulated the oil for the specific needs of motorcycle and quad engines, because we know that a motorcycle engine is different. One of the differences is that motorcycle engines generally develop more power per […]

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BIZOL’s range of motorcycle oils is blended from high-quality oils and additives to provide a unique level of protection. We have formulated the oil for the specific needs of motorcycle and quad engines, because we know that a motorcycle engine is different.

One of the differences is that motorcycle engines generally develop more power per litre than a car engine. The higher power output however has a downside, which is that motorcycle engines are subject to significantly higher internal temperatures and loads than car engines.

The compression ratio in a motorcycle engine is normally higher too, meaning the pressure that develops inside the cylinder and the force that acts on the crankshaft is substantially higher. Another consequence of higher compression pressure is increased combustion gas blow-by into the crankcase. Blow-by raises the concentration of contaminants in the oil, causing it to degrade faster. Motorcycle oil has to contend with a greater amount of contamination and, because a motorcycle engine usually revs at higher speeds, the oil must also be more resistant to foaming.

The majority of motorcycle engines have a common sump, which contains a lubricant for both the engine and the gearbox, The shared lubricant has to work harder than a lubricant in a car engine. Motorcycle engine oil has to provide lubrication and protection to the engine components, ensure smooth gear selection and be compatible with the gearbox and wet clutch components. Optimal clutch operation and take up of drive are additional demands that the oil must fulfil and is the reason why BIZOL Moto engine oils are formulated to maintain high levels of cleanliness.

A critical function that all engine oils have to perform is cooling. The particular challenge for motorcycle engine oil however is that motorcycle cooling systems are, in general, not as efficient as car cooling systems. In addition to lower cooling efficiency is the added stress factor that motorcycle engines have to deal with higher internal temperatures as a consequence of a higher rev range.

Checking the oil level and performing oil changes regularly is therefore vitally important to ensure the longevity of the engine and, in most cases, the gearbox.

So, as you can see, a lot thought and practical experience goes into formulating an oil suitable for a motorcycle, regardless of whether it is a supersport bike, a commuter bike or even a quad.

BIZOL Moto 5W-40 is a high-performance four-stroke engine oil, formulated using the latest technology.

BIZOL Moto 5W-40 is a low viscosity oil that has been developed for four-stroke engines in motorcycles and quads. It complies with the current JASO MA2 specification and is specially formulated for use in motorcycles with wet clutches. The reduction of deposits and prevention of sludging are guaranteed by the use of top-quality base oils and carefully-selected additives.

BIZOL Moto 10W-40 is a high-performance four-stroke engine oil, formulated using the latest technology.

BIZOL Moto 10W-40 has been developed for four-stroke engines in motorcycles and quads. It complies with the current JASO MA2 specification and is specially formulated for use in motorcycles with wet clutches. The reduction of deposits and prevention of sludging are guaranteed by the use of top-quality base oils and carefully-selected additives.

BIZOL Moto 20W-50 is a high-quality four-stroke engine oil, based on tried and trusted technology.

BIZOL Moto 20W-50 delivers optimum performance and protection of the engine all year round. The combination of mineral base oil with advanced additives provides outstanding wear protection and high thermal stress resistance. It complies with the current JASO MA specification and is specially formulated for use in motorcycles with wet clutches.

To see the full range of motorcycle motor oils we offer, please consult our website: https://www.bizol.com/products/full-product-range/motorcycle-motor-oil/

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Outstanding, reliable lubrication https://www.bizol.com/blog/outstanding-reliable-lubrication/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/outstanding-reliable-lubrication/#respond Wed, 08 Dec 2021 15:55:36 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2173 Why is the choice of gear oil important? What difference does it make, which oil is used in the gearbox? Well, the transmission system i.e., the gearbox and final drive, provides the indispensable link between the power unit and the drive wheels. It is the job of the gearbox to multiply the torque coming from […]

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Why is the choice of gear oil important?

What difference does it make, which oil is used in the gearbox? Well, the transmission system i.e., the gearbox and final drive, provides the indispensable link between the power unit and the drive wheels. It is the job of the gearbox to multiply the torque coming from the power unit, whilst the differential multiplies the torque – supplied by the gearbox – again, and distributes it across the driven axle.

The transmission system has to do all of this under the harshest of conditions i.e., high ambient temperatures and freezing conditions, at low-speeds and high-speeds, and with forces being constantly transmitted back and forth through the system. The operating conditions that a gearbox, final drive or transaxle has to deal with are demanding and, with the wrong gear oil or degraded oil, levels of wear can skyrocket.

For instance, a typical 15-kilometre journey across a busy city produces, on average, around 85,000+ gear changes and 17,000+ stop-starts per year. Driving conditions in the city, with repeated stop-start cycles, place the transmission system and lubricant under enormous stress. Ordinary gear oils degrade, simply breaking down under such demands.

Added to these stress factors is the development that vehicles are getting heavier every year. Increased vehicle weight correlates directly to increased loading of the transmission unit and raised mechanical and thermal stress for the gear oil. Gear oil maintenance is therefore critical to ensuring drivetrain longevity and maintaining fuel economy.

Despite advances in tribology and lubricant technology in general, the demands placed on gear oils – both thermal and mechanical – mean that regular replacement is necessary; even if not explicitly stipulated in a manufacturer’s service schedule.

Selecting a high-quality product and ensuring that the oil is chosen according to the application and manufacturer’s specification, is as important as adhering to the recommended replacement interval.

Manufacturers usually specify a standard, minimum-quality oil, but the actual quality of the product used in service is decided by the customer. Cheaper oils often lack high-quality additives, which improve fluidity at low temperatures and prevent premature ageing. Here is where spending a bit more on a higher quality product can make a significant difference.

Criteria such as the ability to withstand repeated extreme-pressure loading, provide lubrication across a wide range of temperatures and, of course, the capability to ensure a reliable high-strength lubricating film are essential functions of a quality gear oil that need to be taken into account when choosing a product.

When is a gear oil change due?

If the vehicle manufacturer or transmission manufacturer stipulates a replacement interval, this is the latest point at which the gear oil must be changed. If manufacturers do not provide a service interval for gear oil, then it is often left to the discretion of the vehicle owner or garage to suggest an oil service.

Prevention is better – and cheaper – than cure, so replacing the gear oil in good time not only works out cheaper in the long run, it also gives you peace of mind.

Once the gear oil has started to break down, common symptoms start to surface, such as

  • gear selection problems
  • noise from the gearbox and final drive
  • judder

which, if left unchecked, will result in internal damage and component failure.

The oil must be changed at the very latest, when problems caused by inferior quality or degraded oil manifest themselves. The first warning signs that gear oil is breaking down, is when gear selection at low ambient temperatures starts to suffer. Whine and abnormal noise coming from the transmission system are another indicator that you need to take action because the oil is obviously degraded and the time has come to replace it.

Aggravating factors, such as condensation forming inside the casing, can put the gear oil under additional stress. Gear oils must be able to absorb a certain amount of moisture or condensation in a similar way to brake fluid. If, however, gear oil can no longer absorb condensation, the result is a breakdown of corrosion protection and the formation of rust inside the unit. Damage due to deposits forming or contamination of the oil is then only a matter of time.

Why is BIZOL Gear Oil the right choice for you?

Put simply, we put in the long hours. BIZOL has done its homework, but we also listen intensely to feedback from the market. We pride ourselves on the quality of our products, striving to deliver quality to our customers day-in, day-out. As it happens, quality can be measured, which is why BIZOL is also certified by the European Engine Lubricants Quality Management System.

All BIZOL MTF oils offer outstanding levels of protection against oxidation and thermal stress, stable extreme-pressure lubrication protection even at high temperatures, whilst offering exceptional wear protection and great fuel-saving potential.

BIZOL Allround TDL 75W-90 is multi-grade gear oil for manual gearboxes and hypoid gear final drives.

Allround TDL 75W-90 is a Total DriveLine gear oil that covers a wide range of passenger car and commercial vehicle applications and meets the specifications of API GL-4. It simplifies the range for consumers and reduces the amount of stock garages need to carry.

It offers optimum lubricating properties, high wear protection and can be used for long service intervals. Highly stable EP additives ensure a strong and reliable lubricating film even under extreme loading. The smooth-running characteristics of this gear oil also have a positive effect on fuel consumption.

The main benefits of Allround TDL 75W-90 include:

  • effective at low temperatures
  • effective wear reduction
  • meets the requirements of modern commercial vehicles

BIZOL Allround Gear Oil MTF 75W is blended for manual transmissions.

Allround Gear Oil MTF 75W uses the latest additive technology and is compatible with a wide range of materials in gearboxes and meets the specifications of API GL-4. BIZOL Allround Gear Oil MTF 75W was especially developed for manual gearboxes and double clutch gearboxes (S tronic and DSG). It offers the highest levels of fuel saving potential as well as excellent shear stability and optimum wear protection.

The main benefits of Allround MTF 75W include:

  • pressure-stable lubrication protection even at hot temperatures
  • excellent protection against oxidation and thermal stress
  • excellent wear protection with high fuel-saving potential

To see the full range of gear oils we offer, please consult our website: https://www.bizol.com/products/full-product-range/gear-oil/

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BIZOL Automatic Transmission Fluids https://www.bizol.com/blog/bizol-automatic-transmission-fluids/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/bizol-automatic-transmission-fluids/#respond Tue, 30 Nov 2021 11:46:14 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2128 Formulated to exceed specifications Automatic transmission fluid is a high-tech operating fluid that has a multitude of functions to perform simultaneously over its service life. Primarily it has to provide pressure and transmit torque but its many other functions include lubrication, cleaning, sealing, absorbing contaminants, cooling, etc. All modern automatic transmission fluids consist of a […]

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Formulated to exceed specifications

Automatic transmission fluid is a high-tech operating fluid that has a multitude of functions to perform simultaneously over its service life. Primarily it has to provide pressure and transmit torque but its many other functions include lubrication, cleaning, sealing, absorbing contaminants, cooling, etc.

All modern automatic transmission fluids consist of a base oil and an additive package to provide the required properties of a particular specification. ATF contains a mix of performance-enhancing chemicals to meet the demands of each gearbox type and typically contains additives such as:

  • anti-wear additives
  • corrosion inhibitors
  • detergents
  • dispersants and surfactants
  • viscosity index improvers and viscosity modifiers
  • seal swell additives and sealing agents
  • anti-foam additives and anti-oxidation compounds
  • cold-flow improvers
  • high-temperature thickeners
  • gasket conditioners

Automatic transmission fluid must provide high lubrication performance, high levels of oxidation stability to withstand high local operating temperatures, good fluidity properties to ensure trouble-free operation in cold conditions, stable viscosity properties and suitable frictional behaviour characteristics to ensure quiet, consistent and judder-free take-up of power.

Many manufacturers claim that their gearboxes are filled-for-life, but this is only possible under laboratory-like conditions. Back in the real-world, the transmission fluid needs to be replaced regularly and some manufacturers have subsequently issued dealers with service bulletins to this effect.

A factor putting higher stresses on transmissions systems is the ever-increasing performance level in passenger cars, which has led to higher amounts of torque being handled by smaller gearboxes. Developments like this mean that there is an increased risk of high temperatures developing more rapidly. The restricted amount of space and lower fluid volumes brought about by the use of smaller housings only increases the risk of overheating.

The greatest enemy of automatic transmission fluid is heat. The greater the loading on the gearbox, the higher the temperature of the oil inside. The build-up of heat is caused by frictional losses of the moving parts inside the gearbox. Oil temperatures in passenger-car transmissions often reach 130°C and, under arduous conditions, can even reach temperatures of around 160°C. The higher the internal temperature, the sooner the transmission fluid will age and break down.

Jerky gear changes and judder

As automatic transmission fluid deteriorates, it starts to change colour, partly due to friction material from brake bands, metal filings and other contaminants suspended in the fluid, but also due to ageing. Heat fatigue in the ATF will eventually turn the fluid from a red colour to brown and eventually black. If the fluid deteriorates this much, the gearbox may have already suffered long-term damage. Waiting until the fluid has deteriorated this far is not a wise idea as damage could be caused to bearing surfaces and/or the valve block and sensitive solenoids that control the flow of fluid around the gearbox.

Common faults associated with degraded ATF include:

  • transmission judder
  • poor selection
  • selection failure
  • burning smell
  • poor take up of drive / poor acceleration

When replacing the transmission fluid, bear the following in mind.

A specific automatic transmission fluid is required to ensure proper transmission performance and protection. The right transmission fluid for each application depends upon vehicle manufacturer, model, model year and transmission type. Observe the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendation to ensure the correct fluid is used and the fluid replacement interval is maintained.

BIZOL has the right fluid for your automatic transmission

BIZOL Protect ATF DCT is a modern high-performance transmission fluid.

BIZOL Protect ATF DCT is for use in vehicles with double clutch transmissions (DCT), e.g., VW, Audi, Seat, Skoda direct shift gearbox transmissions (DSG), Ford (Powershift), Chrysler, Volvo, etc. BIZOL used the latest hydrocracking technology in combination with an outstanding combination of additives to meet and, in some cases, even exceed the requirements of DCT gearbox manufacturers. BIZOL Protect ATF DCT ensures stable friction characteristics, even under harshest operating conditions.

BIZOL Protect ATF D-III+ is a universal automatic transmission fluid.

BIZOL Protect ATF D-III+ uses a tried and trusted formula and can be used in the automatic gearboxes of passenger cars, heavy-goods vehicles, buses and special-purpose vehicles. Protect ATF D-III+ is suitable for use in torque converters, clutch packs as well as in hydraulic power-steering systems. The high-quality base oil and selected additives in BIZOL ATF DIII+ ensure excellent driving characteristics even under heavy load conditions. It is also worth noting that Protect ATF D-III+ has the exceedingly good compatibility with various sealing materials.

BIZOL Protect ATF LV is a modern high-performance automatic transmission fluid.

BIZOL Protect ATF LV is formulated for the new generation of automatic transmissions with low viscosity requirements. The combination of high-quality base oils and advanced additive technology ensures excellent ageing and oxidation stability as well as superior wear protection. It allows for smooth shifting at extremely low ambient temperatures and permits longer oil change intervals. BIZOL Protect ATF LV contains seal conditioner that maintain seals and reduce ageing to give optimal transmission performance for longer.

To see the full range of ATFs we offer, please consult our website: https://www.bizol.com/products/full-product-range/atf/

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Connectivity and vehicle security – do they go together? https://www.bizol.com/blog/connectivity-and-vehicle-security/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/connectivity-and-vehicle-security/#respond Tue, 30 Nov 2021 08:34:37 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2120 Vehicle manufacturers are faced with diametrically opposing demands, the need for ever increasing connectivity in vehicles and the significantly increased threats to vehicle security from cyber criminality. The conflicting requirements that vehicle manufacturers, regulatory bodies and infrastructure providers (aka mobile network providers) have to weigh up and agree a way forward prompts the question, “In […]

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Vehicle manufacturers are faced with diametrically opposing demands, the need for ever increasing connectivity in vehicles and the significantly increased threats to vehicle security from cyber criminality.

The conflicting requirements that vehicle manufacturers, regulatory bodies and infrastructure providers (aka mobile network providers) have to weigh up and agree a way forward prompts the question, “In future, will motor vehicles remain a (relatively) safe space and comfortable form of transport or mutate into mobile bots?”

There are great new possibilities opening up with a multitude of functions and applications on the horizon. Developments are moving on at pace in the fields of infotainment and road-safety improvements. Manufacturers are expanding the networking capability of vehicles to allow the use of apps to facilitate vehicle-to-vehicle communication. The trouble is that even the current crop of vehicles, with relatively limited connectivity, are already susceptible to manipulation.

Hacked off

For example, it is a well-known fact in the industry since 2002 that GPS-based navigation devices can be manipulated. A ‘satellite simulator’ can overwrite the GPS signal that is used by the navigation system to determine the vehicle’s location. Using this method, vehicles can be intentionally diverted from their actual destination.

Traffic messages displayed on the navigation devices are also affected. The Traffic Message Channel (TMC), which is normally used to display traffic jam reports or other information, can be manipulated to this end. The problem is that the TMC channel is not protected and a false traffic message can be sent easily enough to a device via the FM radio signal.

Data theft

Yet another vulnerability is the Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), which has been mandatory for all new vehicles sold in Europe from the end of 2014. Each pressure sensor in the TPMS system has its own ID, which can be scanned and read out.

Information about the location of certain sensors, i.e. vehicles, could be used to draw up user profiles. A list of times that certain cars arrive at or leave company car parks could be created, for example, without the vehicle owner’s knowledge.

The examples given represent a small sample of the potential for unwanted data gathering or manipulation today, using just existing technologies and capabilities. A much greater degree of digitisation is on the cards, which will be implemented in coming vehicle iterations.

At the latest when vehicles start to communicate with each other, when steering wheel movements are completely digitalised and ever more individual functions are controlled by smartphone is when manipulations of vehicle systems can have very serious consequences. Manufacturers such as Daimler already have apps, for example, the Mercedes me app that allows the driver to remotely lock or remotely park the vehicle using their smartphone.

But what about ever greater integration of the smartphone in the latest generation of cars? Previously, only the audio channel, i.e., music or phone calls, could be accessed through the in-car entertainment system via cable or Bluetooth connection. When using Apple Carplay or Android Auto, the applications, such as Facebook, still run on the smartphone with the car providing the entire user interface, i.e., the screen, speakers, microphone, aerial and controls. The familiar social media or infotainment applications are simply displayed in the car.

Data sovereignty

Premium manufacturers are building mobile phone interfaces into their cars and offering their own networked navigation, eCall, roadside assistance and other services. At the moment, the manufacturers use operating systems which only permit their own applications to run. The manufacturers can thus access the car’s operating data and transfer it to their own servers, e.g., for their roadside assistance. The customer can access these servers via the manufacturer’s app for their car and check whether the windows are closed or the battery is already fully charged, for example.

The advantages offered by such developments do, however, have a downside. The vehicle owner must sign a data-usage contract with the manufacturer in order to use these services. The integration of the networked applications in the car means that the customer can only obtain services from the manufacturer.

And this is a problem for third-party service providers. For example, a competing provider who wants to offer a service and cannot access the data in the customer’s car because the owner has signed an exclusive contract with the manufacturer.

The contract excludes any other service provider and this is why it is crucial that consumers have sovereignty over their data. In future, consumers must be free to decide how they want their data to be handled. It is important that consumers can chose a provider free from being tied to the vehicle manufacturer for services related to vehicle maintenance, for example. The car companies must allow third parties access to data from the car so that competition is not snuffed out.

Bricked

But the problems don’t just end with data access, there are also other less obvious and less immediate problems on the horizon. For instance, what if manufacturers discontinue IT support for vehicles long before they have reached the end of their ‘mechanical’ life. In the same way that updates to mobile phone operating systems has led users to accuse phone manufacturers of ‘bricking’ (rendering useless) phones, a vehicle could be ‘bricked’ simply by having an unpatched vulnerability in its operating system.

Update unavailable for this model!

It is also unclear as to what extent the vehicle and all of its functions would remain usable. International regulation is required in this area to ensure that software is updated and patches created for software over and beyond the planned lifetime of the vehicle. In the same way that the supply of replacement parts must be guaranteed by the manufacturer for at least ten years after production of a certain model has ceased.

Safety improvement

A major positive aspect of connected cars is that they can improve road safety. Currently, communication from vehicle to vehicle is very limited. Vehicles can often only communicate with other vehicles from the same manufacturer or the same model. The long-term vision is that all cars will not just communicate with each other but also with non-motorised road users and with traffic lights and traffic signs, etc. Networked communication in this form could revolutionise road safety and largely prevent accidents. But despite promising developments, early tests with heavy goods vehicles are proving just how difficult, for instance, even a simple ‘tethering’ system can be to implement under real-world conditions.

Driven to distraction

On the one hand, new cars are easier to drive but, on the other hand, the number and complexity of assistance systems and features are ever increasing. Additional stimuli or information, regardless of whether the input is coming from a passenger, the radio, an assistance system, telephone or a networked application in the car, places the driver under additional stress and can be a distraction too many!

In the same way that manufacturers prevent the driver from watching television or video on integrated displays when the vehicle is in motion, there is an understandable urge to limit the amount of information a driver can be confronted with when the vehicle is moving. Mobile phone use has been outlawed when driving, except in hands-free mode, in many countries. Applying the same principles, i.e., limiting the range and number of functions that can be accessed by the driver whilst the vehicle is in motion would seem an obvious and desirable outcome.

However, it is irrelevant whether a vehicle is connected to network or not, as the connection does not correlate to greater distraction. The decisive factor is the design of the user interface. Ideally, information should be prioritised and, if necessary, suppressed via workload management. Limiting the degree of input is in this way means that the driver only receives appropriate levels of information so that they are not distracted whilst driving. In practical terms, drivers must decide for themselves which sources of information they can and want to use while driving. Manufacturers should ensure that only indispensable operating actions can be carried out while driving; adjusting most of a car’s settings should only be possible when the car is stationary.

Time will tell

As ever, only time will tell if the advances in connectivity bring more advantages than disadvantages but now is the time when manufacturers and regulatory bodies must join forces to ensure that any advances are not wiped out by negative consequences. From the security of 5G networks to the IT security in the vehicles themselves, a lot of debate and a robust regulatory framework is needed in advance or else the future of mobility could be significantly affected.

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Winter check – tips on how to get your car ready for winter https://www.bizol.com/blog/winter-check-tips-on-how-to-get-your-car-ready-for-winter/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/winter-check-tips-on-how-to-get-your-car-ready-for-winter/#respond Thu, 25 Nov 2021 14:48:50 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2098 Winter is around the corner and colder weather is on its way. Sub-zero temperatures and a poorly maintained vehicle can be a bad combination and suffer the effects of frost due to: frozen water in the washer-fluid reservoir condensation in the engine oil insufficient antifreeze strength in the cooling circuit Any water contained in the […]

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Winter is around the corner and colder weather is on its way.

Sub-zero temperatures and a poorly maintained vehicle can be a bad combination and suffer the effects of frost due to:

  • frozen water in the washer-fluid reservoir
  • condensation in the engine oil
  • insufficient antifreeze strength in the cooling circuit

Any water contained in the engine oil – or coolant with insufficient antifreeze content – can freeze, potentially causing extensive and expensive damage. Make sure the engine oil has been changed as scheduled and that the coolant strength is high enough.

To avoid the inconvenience of a breakdown or failure, check your vehicle before winter and the cold weather sets in. Garages offer winter checks to make sure your car is ready for the coldest season of the year and can remedy any faults on the spot, but you can also perform the necessary checks yourself. Here are the most important points to remember.

Seven tips for the winter check

  • check and adjust operating fluids
  • check the auxiliary drive belts
  • check the condition of tyres/rims, tread depth and tyre pressures
  • check lighting for function and damage – including headlight aim
  • check the windscreen wiper blades and screen washing system
  • check electrical components
  • check locks/handles for freedom of movement and lubricate

Battery

Fact, car batteries do not perform as well in cold and freezing temperatures. Headlights, screen heating, windscreen wipers and other electrical consumers increase the amount of power required and drain the battery additionally in winter. If the vehicle is only driven over short distances, not only can the alternator not maintain battery charge, but also the increased number of cold starts place excessive load on the battery.

Avoid repeated short journeys, if possible, as even a healthy battery can discharge under such load conditions.

Cold-cranking current test: can be measured at a garage and indicates the battery’s health.

What do you need to do?

A quick test, which you can perform if you own a multimeter, is checking the battery voltage.

Check the battery terminals and earth straps for corrosion. If the battery terminals, earth straps or other electrical connections are corroded or dirty, this prevents electrical energy from flowing freely. The supply of electrical current to the starter motor is critical and even minor causes of electrical resistance can significantly affect starting performance at low temperatures.

What you need: a few hand tools – mainly small spanners or a small socket set, contact cleaner and a multimeter to check battery voltage or alternator output.

Windscreen wipers & washer fluid

Check and adjust the level in the washer fluid reservoir. Add winter washer fluid with antifreeze otherwise you risk the windscreen washer system freezing.

Check the condition of the wiper blades and replace as necessary.

Driving on motorways covered in snow and slush can quickly result in ‘flying blind’ with a dirty windscreen. In the worst case, failure to add winter screenwash can result in the washer reservoir and washer pump being damaged. The wiper blades should also be checked, if they leave streaks or no longer wipe properly, they must be replaced.

Replace worn and split wiper blades

What you need to do?

Use up the summer screenwash in autumn and replace it with winter additive.

What you need: winter screenwash and wiper blades, as necessary.

Lighting

Check lighting for function and damage

Lighting is essential in winter, as daylight is in shorter supply and the sky is often grey even when daylight is available.

What you need to do?

A simple visual check, walk around the vehicle and check that the lights at the front and rear of the vehicle are working and not damaged. You will need a second person to press the brake pedal, so that you can check the function of the brake lights.

Headlight aim should be checked too: this is a job for a garage, because they have the corresponding beam checking/setting equipment.

Professional beam setting tool in garage setting

Coolant

Check and adjust the level and antifreeze strength.

If the antifreeze content in the coolant is insufficient, the cooling system can freeze and costly damage can result. But even at temperatures above freezing, it is essential to maintain the correct coolant mixture ratio. Caution, when choosing antifreeze consult the owner’s manual and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Only mix coolants of a compatible type, otherwise, the cooling circuit could be damaged.

What you need to do?

Check the level in the expansion tank and adjust as necessary, the coolant should be just under the MAX mark. Check the freezing point of the coolant with an antifreeze tester and add neat antifreeze if necessary.

What you need: an antifreeze tester – an inexpensive and readily available tool

Auxiliary drive belt(s)

Check the belts for wear and tension. Auxiliary drive belts often drive critically important components, such as the water pump, alternator or power-steering pump. As the auxiliary drive belts perform such an important task, the condition must be checked to ensure that the belts do not fail. What you are looking for is cracks in the V-grooves or outer surface of the belt or even chunks of rubber missing from the belt.

What you need to do?

Visually inspect the belts for wear and damage, use a torch as necessary.

If the belt is slack, adjust belt tension if possible. If the belt is damaged or worn, obtain a new belt and replace the existing belt.

A belt displaying damage like this must be replaced.

What you need: a torch and, if necessary, spanners or a socket set for belt replacement

Tyres

Check the overall condition of the tyres. Make sure that there are no bulges, no nails or similar lodged in the tread, no cuts or damage to the sidewalls or carcass, no exposed belts and that the tread depth is sufficient; at least 1.5 mm. Damage that could result in a puncture or sudden deflation must be remedied immediately!

Underinflated tyres pose a risk, as underinflation can lead to the following:

  • longer stopping distances
  • decreased vehicle stability
  • rim damage – the sidewall can no longer protect the rim
  • sidewall damage
  • tyre failure

In wintry weather, make sure you have the right tyres. Summer tyres are not designed for cold weather – they have a hard rubber compound and the tread pattern is less suited to wintry conditions. Sufficient tread depth and the correct tyre pressure settings are also essential for stable handling.

What you need to do?

Change to winter tyres in good time, check and correct the correct tyre pressure, the values can be found in the owner’s manual, inside the fuel filler cap or on a sticker on the B-pillar. Tyre tread depth is best measured with a tread depth gauge.

What you need: tyre-pressure gauge, which can be found at the nearest filling station, and a tread-depth gauge.

Tread depth should be at least 1.5 mm across the width of the running surface.

When the list of checks has been completed, your vehicle is ready for the rigours of winter.

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Temperature gauge showing hot, even when the weather’s not? https://www.bizol.com/blog/temperature-gauge-showing-hot-even-when-the-weathers-not/ https://www.bizol.com/blog/temperature-gauge-showing-hot-even-when-the-weathers-not/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.bizol.com/blog/?p=2078 Is the temperature needle heading for the red? Typical, just when you could do without it, you’re stuck in traffic and your engine is overheating! You might not have paid much attention to it, but the temperature gauge has probably been showing a higher temperature than normal for a while now, getting progressively worse, but […]

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Is the temperature needle heading for the red? Typical, just when you could do without it, you’re stuck in traffic and your engine is overheating! You might not have paid much attention to it, but the temperature gauge has probably been showing a higher temperature than normal for a while now, getting progressively worse, but what is the problem?

Common causes of overheating

  • a faulty thermostat
  • a clogged cooling system
  • poor airflow to the radiator
  • the cooling fan has stopped working, due to
    • a malfunctioning thermostatic fan switch
    • broken fan blades
    • a malfunctioning viscous fan coupling
    • a broken or slipping drive belt
  • incorrect antifreeze mixture
  • etc., …

Is there a simple and cost-effective way to cure the problem?

If you can eliminate the obvious causes, e.g., a slipping drive belt, coolant mixture, broken fan etc. and suspect the radiator is blocked, then cleaning the cooling system with BIZOL Radiator Clean r70 could well be the answer.

Over time cooling systems can become less efficient as the coolant pump, radiator channels and waterways can get slowly choked by the formation of deposits. Corrosion, sludge, scale and other deposits form, unseen, inside the radiator, heater matrix and engine block, significantly lowering cooling system efficiency. BIZOL Radiator Clean r70 is a cost-effective way of eradicating unwanted contaminants and can restore cooling system efficiency.

Treatment with Radiator Clean r70 is a certainly less expensive and time-consuming method than removing, inspecting and replacing expensive parts.

How does BIZOL Radiator Clean r70 work?

BIZOL Radiator Clean r70 is intended to reset the cooling system, restoring cooling performance, preventing overheating in summer and freezing in winter. The special formula removes scale and rust particles, then neutralises and flushes out the harmful deposits to give you a rust, sludge and scale-free result.

How do I restore my cooling system’s performance?

Open the bonnet, remove the pressure cap and pour in a tin of BIZOL Radiator Clean r70 and refit the pressure cap.

Start the engine and let it idle for 15 minutes to get the thermostat open and so that the additive circulates fully around the system. BIZOL Radiator Clean r70 can now get to work, cleaning the channels in the radiator, the coolant pump and waterways in the engine block.

When the coolant has had sufficient time to circulate, switch off the engine and allow the cooling system to cool down before performing any work on the system. The next step is to drain the cooling system. Disconnect the bottom radiator hose or loosen the radiator drain plug and drain the system. As an extra precaution to ensure that all of the sludge and deposits are removed from the system, you could flush the radiator with fresh water before reconnecting the bottom hose.

Now, with the corrosion, sludge and scale thoroughly flushed out of the system, reattach the bottom radiator hose. All that’s left to do now is refill the cooling system in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and bleed the system. Well done, that’s it, you’ve earned yourself a coffee.

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